Tag Archives: paragraph

Allegory in Short Film: Neighbours (1952)

Stop motion by Norman McLaren:

In the award-winning film “Neighbours”, concrete elements are used to powerfully express abstract ideas. The fence plays an important part as both a set and prop, and presents an allegory that is linked to the timeline of events in the film. The fence’s role and purpose change throughout the story, and its degradation can signify the transformation of the men’s relationship. Friendship between the two was found before the existence of the fence. The fence first appears as a territorial mark between the two properties as the two men claim their land. As the argument escalates, the pickets are used as a weapon as the men start a light duel. The fight worsens, and the blows hit by the wood get harsher and more deadly. As war is declared, the fence’s original purpose as a boundary is terminated and its destruction symbolizes the breaking of a barrier. The splintered wood decorates the coffins of the two men, portraying peace once more, and the end of a terrible fight. The fence’s state changes and each different stage can be related to the cycle of human relationships and the fomenting of war.

Published from November 25, 2010.

Thanks for reading,
thebookybunhead

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Asbestos: Mini Research

File:Asbestos with muscovite.jpg

Courtesy of Wikipedia

Asbestos is a mineral of fibrous crystals that absorbs sound, has textile strength, and a resistance to heat, chemical, and electrical damage. Its fibers can be woven into yarn or rope, and are easily added to a variety of materials such as cotton and cement, making it a versatile substance. The inhalation of these fibers has been proved to cause illnesses including cancer and asbestosis. Asbestos is used in many products from drywall roofing tars, to shoes and stage curtains, because of its fireproofing and insulating qualities. It became popularly used by manufacturers and builders in the 19th century as a common insulator and propelled the Industrial Revolution; however, asbestos has been used for as long as 4500 years in Ancient Greece when it was used in oil lamp wicks and ceremonial table cloths. The extraction, manufacturing, and processing of asbestos has been banned in whole or in part by over 60 countries in the world, including those in the European Union. Even though today, far less products in the home contain asbestos, it is still used because of new ways of containing escaping fibers. Canada has yet to ban asbestos and is currently the largest player in the global asbestos industry; over 40% of the world’s asbestos is found in a narrow belt of rocks in Quebec and over 300,000 tons of it can be exported annually to developing countries. The banning of asbestos is a difficult balance for Canada between saving jobs and economic profit or relieving the health hazards placed on workers and consumers from this multi-purpose material.

Written 2009. Since then, Canada’s asbestos industry has been winding down. For anyone who wonders what asbestos is…

Thanks for reading,
thebookybunhead

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Le philosophie de Voltaire: Short paragraph en français

Le bonheur et le bon sens de vie

La philosophie de Voltaire est simplement que travail est le secret pour le bonheur véritable. Il croit dans un style de vie qui est introverti et qui concentre sur les tâches de soi-même. Voltaire a opposé l’idée de Leibnitz que tout qui se passe et un produit du cause et effet, et que tout arrive pour un raison, ou pour « les meilleurs du monde ». Voltaire admet qu’il y a de mal dans le monde, mais beaucoup des catastrophes, comme un tremblement de terre ou la mort, n’ont pas une explication que des humains peuvent comprendre. Il faut que nous n’inquiétions pas des grands problèmes ou des bavardages qui sont hors de propos à nos vies. Voltaire croit que les actions sont plus fortes que les mots ; des pensées doivent être appliquées pratiquement et traduites dans les efforts concrets. Le travail fait une personne heureuse par repoussant l’ennui et improductivité.  Essentiellement, Voltaire a dit que le foyer est la détermination sont important pour atteindre la potentielle maximum de chacun individuel et pour apprécier la vie précieuse. La vie significative est plein de bonheur est crée par se développer nos talents, travailler fort à nos buts, et dans les mots de ce philosophe remarquable, par « cultiver notre jardin ».

Thanks/Merci,
thebookybunhead

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Yet another paragraph on Romeo and Juliet

FORESHADOWING

            Foreshadowing is a technique that is frequently used in Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet to create several dramatic effects. Repeated references reminding us of the inevitable deaths make suspense, anticipation, as well as dramatic irony because we know the ending that the characters do not. A first example of foreshadowing is shown by a quote from Friar Lawrence as he explains the balance of nature:

O mickle is the powerful grace that lies

In plants, herbs, stones, and their true qualities:

For nought so vile, that on the earth doth live;

But to the earth some special good doth give;

Nor ought so good but, strain’d from that fair use,

Revolts from true birth, stumbling on abuse.

Virtue turns itself vice, being misapplied,

And vice sometime by action dignified (2.3. 15-22)

In nature, everything has its proper place and it is people’s misapplication of its resources that destroys the balance between good and bad. While a mentor to Romeo and Juliet, the friar fails to follow his own teachings; he meddles, steps out of his role, and also abuses nature by using it to attempt to fix his problems. He foreshadows his own foolishness and the problems that will arise when two heirs of opposing houses defy their places in society. Before their marriage, Romeo makes a bold statement that challenges the fates and foreshadows the following crisis. He declares that “Death may come and do what he wants as long as he had Juliet” (2.6. 7-8) that foreshadows a twist in fortune for their new love as well as the coming of death, specifically the following murders of Mercutio and Tybalt. As the plot escalates, foreshadowing of death becomes more frequent that the two lovers begin to see death in each other. As they part, Juliet gravely notices that he looks “as one dead in the bottom of a tomb” (3.5.56) to which Romeo replies, “…trust me love, in my eye so do you:/Dry sorrow drinks our blood” (3.5.58-9). They see a tragic ending in their love story and foreshadow their own deaths. Constant foreshadowing keeps readers in anticipation for the deaths; however, when the ending finally happens, it is still surprising. In conclusion, although we know the results of the future because of the reminders scattered throughout quotes, the looming knowledge of Romeo and Juliet’s deaths make the actual event more dramatic and meaningful.

Written February 2, 2011.

This is the last assignment I’m posting on Romeo and Juliet, I promise! I love the play, but I’m not obsessed with it, I just thought it might be a resource to someone out there. If you missed the last Romeo and Juliet piece I posted, here it is: https://thebookybunhead.wordpress.com/2013/04/01/romeo-and-juliet-essay-themes-in-ballet-and-play/

Thanks for reading,
thebookybunhead

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The Sublime: Frankenstein inspired paragraph

Water lapped my waist as I stood, heels sucked into the sand, sandpaper hair swiftly blown over sandpaper skin. Water is everywhere, gently rocking me like a piece of kelp – the waves are quiet for now, as if they were waiting, like me, but I know they could swallow me up in their swirling depths if they wanted to. A rippling surface stretches forever, past the drop at the end of the world, where a giant red disk slowly descends, inching closer and closer for a dip in Earth’s pool. Salty eyes squint at burning fire as it grows still, its radiance too intense to see and too magnificent to glance away from. And then, it finally happens. The brilliance extends its tendrils across the vastness of the sky, illuminating the canvas with brushes of orange and gold, splashes of rose and magenta, dashes here and there of deep blue and violet. The symphony of an entire spectrum makes my heart race and my breath silent, and I close my eyes, trying to absorb, to capture and embed the vivid scene into my memory in a way no camera can. When I open them, it has all started to soften; bright colours mellow into a blend and the light fades as evening floats down, like a blanket folding over the planet. A glowing arc peeks over the horizon, where waves continue to stir restlessly, transforming into a sea of dark goo with the disappearing light. A chill runs through my bones as suddenly cold water sprays into my face and I lift my ankles from the unseen floor, a speck in the endless swells of liquid drifting slowly back to shore.

Sunset at the Island of Kanawa, Indonesia  by Richard Susanto

Sunset at the Island of Kanawa, Indonesia
Credit: Richard Susanto (500px.com/ChenHauHau)

Wrote this for school. Seems I’m excited for summer already.
Thanks for reading,
thebookybunhead

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Regret: Another nostalgic paragraph assignment

There was a smell of Regret in the air tonight. She (Rebecca) smiled and turned the fancy in her mind. There was a thought. What did Regret smell like? Like smoke and rust and cobwebs. And if you wondered what Regret sounded like it sounded like the airy whispers of forgotten ghosts, and crushed bone, and a mirror shattering into a thousand tiny slivers, and silent screams. And, going further, what did Regret look like? Regret looked like dead flies trapped between the glasses of a windowsill or it looked like invisible splinters in the tip of a finger, or a burning piece of crumpled paper slowly engulfed by flames, slowly crumbling into nothing but withered ashes. That was how Regret smelled and looked and sounded. And tonight – Rebecca shoved a hand into the pack of cigarettes – tonight you could almost touch Regret.
(The Streetlight Chronicles)

This was a fill-in-the-blank-type assignment entitled “Is Characterizing Abstract Nouns Personification?” written in 2009. We were inspired to write our own version of the following paragraph written by Ray Bradbury:

There was a smell of Time in the air tonight. He (Tomas) smiled and turned the fancy in his mind. There was a thought. What did Time smell like? Like dust and clocks and people. And if you wondered what Time sounded like it sounded like water running in a dark cave and voices crying and dirt dropping down upon hollow box lids, and rain. And, going further, what did Time look like? Time looked like snow dropping silently into a black room or it looked like a silent film in an ancient theatre, or one hundred billion faces falling like those New Year balloons, down and down into nothing. That was how Time smelled and looked and sounded. And tonight – Tomas shoved his hand into the wind outside the truck – tonight you could almost touch Time.
(Ray Bradbury, The Martian Chronicles)

Thanks for reading,
thebookybunhead

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Personification paragraph assignment

The breathing block of cold stand lonely in the bare corner of the kitchen, humming to itself, glumly. Its boring, smooth face hides underneath a magnetic collage of seasonal picture frames and cards, magnetic maple leafs and hockey sticks with ‘Canada’ written on them, cartoon spelling alphabets and mini plush animals. The jolly decor that covers the otherwise empty wall distracts one from the quiet grumbling caused by the refrigerator’s internal burden of frozen veggies and giant pitchers of juice. It mopes in its limited patch of floor, sinking slouchily from exhaustion because it can’t sit down, and silently shuddering from the freezing air it contains. Its only importance is to keep cheese cold and no one notices its discomfort or unhappiness. The fridge stays in the kitchen this way until someone wants a yogurt tube and opens the door. And in that one moment, it awakes from its monotonous slumber, growing taller brightening its lights, blowing a chilly sigh of relief to the one who saw its existence. It stays somewhat happy for a minute or two, feeling a tiny bit of pride flutter from somewhere deep within and momentarily congratulates itself for its ingenious usefulness. But soon, it discretely retracts back into its quiet place, slowly settling back into its lonely, melancholic way. And the refrigerator stands dull again in its insignificant corner of the kitchen, humming a little tune to itself, like it always does when it feels invisible.

Rediscovered and republished from 2009
by thebookybunhead

PS: I believe this character may have been inspired by this beloved robot from The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy: there is certainly a resemblance, no?


Marvin the Paranoid Android

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