Tag Archives: emotion

Lunacy (NaPoWriMo #4)

image

Elliot Erwitt - Egypt, 1958

Heavy fluttering adrenaline
Searches for an empty space
In the dark.

—————————————
A title alike its name, this lune is an interpretation of anxiety, but is also inspired by the feelings I’ve had entering an audition. Excitement can be overwhelming and the first task is to find a vacant spot in the studio. Today we entered class chattering, to find a pitch black theatre, lit by a small table lamp sitting on the piano in the corner. The scene was both serene and sinister, and senses somehow both restricted and heightened, as we warmed up in hushed conversation and darkness. (Lights were turned on before we started dancing, thank goodness!)

Thanks for reading,
thebookybunhead

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Filed under NaPoWriMo Challenge

5 quick ways to relax (and stop panic in its tracks)

Life is not a straight, flat road which is good since that would be awfully boring. But sometimes it can get a bit too hectic mentally or physically, so here are a few easy ways to catch those runaway emotions, collect yourself, and relax quickly in times of dire stress.

breathe
1. Breathe deeply, very deeply

We are always breathing, but we do not always think about it. Our bodies need oxygen so take in some deep breaths to fill up your entire lungs and bodies like Aunt Marge in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban. Go outside if you can, sometimes fresh air is all you need.

2. Immerse yourself in music

Grab your iPod and those headphones and blast your favourite tunes. Whether it is your angry, sad, or optimistic playlist, listen, really listen to the music for a few minutes escape from reality to refocus your head.

Girl talking on the phone about a boyfriend, 1951 by Gordon Parks. S)
3. Vent it out

Talk. It is much more efficient than texting and there is something very satisfying in hearing your own voice spew out all the thoughts that have been occupying your subconscious. Just be sure to pick a good listener whom you trust so there is no holding back in clearing your head space.

4. Drink something

It is amazing how much energy is drained from stress, so water is best to hydrate your body. Make a quick cup of tea, drink a  good ol’ glass of tap water (Toronto’s is very good, by the way) or even splash some water on your face for some extra refreshing effects.

Focus

5. Direct your energy

When there is no time, concentrate every particle in your body on the task at hand. Don’t think, just do. Acknowledge your troubles but set them aside, and use any negative energy to do a simple, random task. It will release the bad vibes and you also get to check something off your to-do list.
(Like for literalism!)

It has been a very long day not short of some rough spots. It was a day of big tests and big rehearsals – my brain and my legs are fried. Some of these really helped me today and I don’t want to forget them, so that explains the unexpected advice post. I hope it was somewhat helpful.

Thanks for reading,
-thebookybunhead

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Filed under The happenings, Words

When Elephants Weep: Brief Book Review

So, this title quickly caught my eye as I was browsing the book shelf as I have always been a sucker for anything animal-themed. Thought it indeed had some very fascinating and touching stories regarding our non-human friends, I must admit this book was not quite what I expected.

Stories include:

– A mother giraffe fends off a lion for an hour to defend her child.
– Koko the gorilla cares for a “pet” kitten she names “All Ball.”
– A male falcon displays uncharacteristic behavior, including sounds that sound like cries of anguish, when his mate is killed.
– A gorilla who is given orange juice as a treat, gives it instead one day to a researcher who complains of a stomach ache. When she returns ten days later, the gorilla insists on the researcher drinking her juice until reassured that the stomach ache is gone.
– And of course, the thing that gives this book its title: elephants have been seen to cry on numerous occasions.
(These examples summarized in the review by Andrew J. Sydlik)

While I thoroughly enjoyed such a vast archive of accounts and stories (this book is well researched and referenced), often times the book takes on a rather ‘preachy’ tone, focusing on the argument of whether animals have feelings or not, instead of insight into how feelings and behaviour integrate which was what I expected. I don’t know how different the views on animal cruelty were when this book was published in 1995, but regardless I find a lot of the book scorning denial for superiority of the human race and scientists who do not take emotions as seriously as they should, when  instead it could have highlighted works that have been done to support the argument of existence and importance of emotions in non-humans.

That being said, and being the biased animal lover that I am, the many stories will leave you well entertained and more affectionate of our animal friends than you were before, so I would say, give it a go, just feel free to skip some of the in-between stuff.

Thanks for reading!
-thebookybunhead

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Filed under Books