Tag Archives: culture

Swoon

The first time I saw this guy play the male lead in the modern movie adaptation of Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night, She’s the Man, I thought, what an attractive fellow. That movie became a favourite that with every repetition made me fancy Channing Tatum even more. In the dance movie Step Up and the genuinely entertaining buddy cop movie 21 Jump Street, he also plays the strong but sensitive guy, which I guess suits him really well since he is just so. darn. attractive. in each one.

Zac Efron has come a long way from the teen bopping first-world-problem ridden Troy Bolton from Disney’s High School Musical. In 17, Again (a middle aged man returns to his teenage self for a second chance in life) and Neighbours (a young family lives next to a fraternity house and chaos ensues) he again plays a charming, popular teenager but with some hints of maturity. Makes sense, since he now looks like this:

Despite the facepalms that faking drops and rolls receive, soccer players are among the most attractive athletes. Watching FIFA in the 2000’s Brazilian player Ricardo Kaka caught my eye, and not just because he was one of the best players on the team. Here he is seen with Sao Paulo FC celebrating a goal or something, and more relevant to this post, looking pretty handsome.

I have been watching Suits, basically a soap of rich and well dressed lawyers, but hey, it’s so good! One of the main characters is Mike Ross, played by (Canadian- yay!) Patrick J Adams, a lucky “good” guy who got a job as a lawyer despite not having gone to law school and who has a legendary eidetic (photographic) memory. Between his confidence of his skills and learning the ropes we see the sensitive and playful sides of the character that ultimately makes Mike Ross very likeable. The actor looks pretty good outside of a suit too.

Ok. Emma Watson is amazingly beautiful. She was adorable in the first Harry Potter movies and since then has grown up to be not only a recognized actress but also a role model for how gracefully she handles the press and stays true to herself amid growing up as a celebrity. She started off the pixie cut trend for women, is definitely intelligent and a natural beauty, and I am very excited to hear she will be playing Belle in the live action rendition of Beauty and the Beast coming out in a couple years!

Day 14: Pictures of five celebrity crushes

 

 

Advertisements

1 Comment

Filed under 30-Day Personal Challenges

If I wander:

1. ROME

The Colloseum, the Roman Forum, the Pantheon, all the old ancient  buildings, authentic pizza and spaghetti, and Vatican City!
Venice (canals!), Florence (more architecture and art!), Milan (fashion!) and Verona (Romeo and Juliet!) are other cities in Italy I would like to visit, but Rome first!

2. ICELAND

It’s small country so I think it’s specific enough. I would go here just for the landscape – including volcanoes, hot springs, waterfalls, glaciers and Aurora Borealis. Also I’ve always thought it was funny how Iceland is actually pretty green, and Greenland pretty icy, those are some misleading labels.

Source: lonelyplanet.com/mexicocity

3. MEXICO CITY

I would be lying if I said that the fact that my boyfriend is Mexican didn’t have anything to do with me wanting to visit Mexico City. I was always interested in seeing what a Mexican beach was like, though Bali (which I’ve been to) and Hawaii have priority. But now I would like to visit Mexico, and its capital which has old ancient temples and pyramids like Teotihuacan, delicious food (tacos and fruit!), and all the architecture and cultural things that go with it. Will actually be checking this destination as well as Acapulco of the list for New Year’s – yay!

Source: travelieu.com/imagepath/Kyoto-Pic-06.jp

4. KYOTO

I’ve always wanted to go to Japan for their unique culture (and sushi!) and although Tokyo would be the large city with all the buzz and technology (like the bullet trains and smart toilets), Kyoto seems to me like the quieter, more scenic, and more traditional city to go to. There are lots of Buddhist temples, shrines, gardens (cherry blossoms!), and traditional buildings as well as old-fashioned tea ceremony and dining experiences.

Source: privatejetcentral.flights/popular-destinations/africa/cape-town/

5. CAPETOWN

Ever since a friend showed me a picture of her view from Capetown, I thought what a beautiful city! Mountains and sea mean lots of landscape to explore as well as the beach. The jail that used to house Nelson Mandela and the Diamond Museum, as well as African food and culture which I know very little about would be very interesting to visit.

Day 5: Five places you want to visit

Here are a few honorable mentions:
Somewhere in Australia
Agra and New Delhi in India
Moscow, Russia
Barcelona, Spain
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

And places I’ve already been but would live to visit again:
Bali, Jakarta, and Surabaya in Indonesia
California in general (surfing and skiing on the same day, oh my!)
Houston, Texas (everything is bigger and Murican)
Vancouver, Canada (again, an ocean and mountains combination, except in the best country ever)

2 Comments

Filed under 30-Day Personal Challenges

Bolong (NaPoWriMo #2)

The tofu man’s cart rattles along dimly lit roads,
Calling out to those in want of warm ginger soup.
He clatters a bell piercing through the song of crickets and toads.
In the shadows, a young lady emerges around the loop.
She smiles as he ladles a generous serving into a bowl,
And hands cupping the dish, lets the steam rise up into her face.
It might rain; there is a sound of plopping liquid as she gives it a taste.
Dropping a coin in his palm she hurries away, and to his horror he sees his soup trailing behind,
Through her back from a big gaping hole.

—————————————-
For a poem based on exotic mythology, I was inspired by a trickster spirit my mother told me about, in the form of a woman with a hole in her back. Bolong means hole in Indonesian, and I suppose it would be a fun (but scary for the victim obviously) prank to play on anything requiring the digestive passageway. I am behind on 30 poems for NaPoWriMo with 10 left to go, but congratulations to everyone who completed the challenge today! I will continue writing the prompts – there is lots of inspiration just not enough time – and hopefully this is not a total faux-pas.

Thanks for reading,
thebookybunhead

3 Comments

Filed under NaPoWriMo Challenge

Copenhagen: A Summer Exchange

Copyright thebookybunhead 2012

From the moment I stepped out of the airport, I knew that my second time in Europe as a professional ballet exchange student would be no less than wonderful. Everyone was very welcoming and even Copenhagen itself seemed to greet me with its warm colours and lively streets. The next two weeks would be spent dancing with the Royal Danish Ballet and exploring the sights and sounds of the city!

We had ballet classes in the morning, one with students of the school, and one with professional dancers of the company. It was nice to have the variety of levels and intensity every day, as well as to meet many great people. We also took some other classes such as repertoire and Pilates, with Bournonville being particularly fun as a trademark Danish style with its charming expression and agile steps. It was an inspiring and exciting experience to take company class and I admit it made me feel impatient that apprenticeship starts a year earlier there!

We watched company rehearsals, and though it was too early in the season to see a performance, we got a tour of the beautiful, golden, traditional theatre and saw excerpts of ballet pieces in an annual outdoor show that promoted the Det Kongelige Teatre. It became chilly after sunset, yet the audience of thousands stayed sitting on the grass wrapped in blankets until a standing ovation at the end of the night; it was a kind of cultural appreciation I was quite impressed with.

Throughout the afternoons walking the streets of Copenhagen, we discovered many parks, observatory towers, and pretty buildings, and realized it was impossible to walk a few minutes without snapping pictures of a cool fountain or statue. I had the chance to ride in a canal tour, go to two of the oldest amusement parks in Europe, look at art (including a Degas exhibition) in a couple of the many museums that offer free access, and just enjoy the street and night life.

I once read that Denmark was named the happiest country in the world, and I can say I easily believe it with the relaxed, “go-with-the-flow” atmosphere I felt during my stay. Everyone I met was so nice that I often forgot I was a foreigner, at least until Danish was spoken, which I found out has absolutely no resemblance to English. I was sad to leave but was looking forward to bring back everything I had learned to grow more as a dancer and a person in my final year at NBS! Between the ballet and the excursions with friends, I had a grand time in Copenhagen and hope to visit again someday.

So, this is part of why my summer was packed to write as much as I wanted. The first month of gr.12 has been so busy but I’m really hoping to get this blog up and active again.

Thanks for reading,
thebookybunhead

9 Comments

Filed under Ballet, Oh Life, The happenings

Shakespeare Quote: Short Response

candle

Credit and link at end of article.

Heaven doth with us as we with torches do,

Not light for themselves; for if our virtues

Did not go forth of us, ‘twere all alike

As if we had them not.

This quote states a purpose of man’s life through a religious metaphor and explains the importance of sharing the ‘light’ with others instead of keeping it to oneself. Just as a torch’s purpose is to shed light on other objects, humans are called to be God’s instruments to spread goodness around the world. It is important to not limit one’s virtues to thoughts and ideas, but to show them in one’s actions in life. To continue with the theme of light, having a match in a dark cave and leaving it unlit would produce the same result of not having a potential light source at all. A person with virtues left unshared might as well be a person with no virtues at all.

Republished from English class 2012. Photo courtesy of J. Devaun.

Thanks for reading,
thebookybunhead

Leave a comment

Filed under Academia

Jack Diamond: A Brief Biography of a Canadian Artist

Source of photograph: utccanada.ca

Canadian Jack Diamond is an internationally acclaimed architect known for his simple and artistic designs. He was born November 1932 in South Africa and immigrated to Canada in 1964. He studied at various universities and received several degrees: Bachelor of Architecture degree from the University of Cape Town in 1956; Master of Arts degree in politics, economy, and philosophy from Oxford in 1958; and Master of Architecture degree from the University of Pennsylvania in 1962. He founded his own company now Diamond and Schmitt Architects in 1975.

From then on he has created many structures around the world including the Citadel Theatre in Edmonton; the Jerusalem City Hall in Israel; the Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts in Toronto; the Harman Centre for the Arts in Washington, D.C.; and the Southbrook Vineyards Winery in Niagara Falls. His works in progress include an addition to the famous Mariinsky Theatre in St. Petersburg Russia (now completed). He was made an Officer of the Order of Canada in 1995 and given the Order of Ontario two years later.

Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts

Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts in Toronto, Canada
Source: dsai.ca/projects/four-seasons-centre-for-the-performing-arts-canadian-opera-company

Jack Diamond believes in creating buildings that are not for flashy display; but that are useful for the people using them. He thinks not only appearance, but functionality. “We were just interviewing for a project at a university in the United States,” he said. “The president asked us, ‘Have you ever designed a building that causes a car crash? Because I’m looking for an architect who’s going to design a building that causes a car crash.’ There’s a kind of group who is looking for a building that will snap your head, literally grabbing attention. But does it have any deeper ability to contribute to the life of the university, to the life of the faculty, to the experience of students, to its connection to the grain of the community? Do any of those matter at all? Diamond + Schmitt does not do car crash.” Whether people agree to his designs or not, there is no doubt that Jack Diamond is a master of his art form.

New Mariinsky Theatre

New Mariinsky Theatre in St. Petersburg, Russia
Source: dsai.ca/projects/new-mariinsky-theatre-russia

Republished from a Geography research assignment in 2010. Being a dancer, I chose to display two performing arts theatres, but Mr. Diamond does a very wide range of work.

Thanks for reading,
thebookybunhead

4 Comments

Filed under Academia

Sahtu Dene: Canadian Aboriginals and Uranium Radiation

Interview: The Dene People

Q: I am joined today by a member of the Sahtu Dene tribe from the community of Deline in the Northwest Territories. First of all, thank you for coming. What can you tell us about your community and the meaning of your names?

A: The Dene is an aboriginal group living in the northern boreal and arctic regions of Canada. Dene is the common Athabaskan word for people and Sahtu is our name for Great Bear Lake, the fifth largest freshwater lake in Canada and ninth in the world. Deline is located 300 miles from Yellowknife with a population of 800 and means “where the river flows”.

Q: Deline was featured in the film Village of Widows after discovering the devastating effects of radiation poisoning from uranium mines. But let’s start from the beginning, when and where did mining start?

A: Port Radium was owned originally by Eldorado and secretly became a government-owned mine in 1942. The men started work in 1932, mostly working as labourers and carriers for the unrefined pitchblende ore. From 1934 to 1939 we mined radium and between 1943 and 1962, uranium. It was seen as an exciting job opportunity and everyone was eager to participate.

Q: The Canadian government didn’t tell you of the dangers and effects of the substances?

A: Not at all. As far as we were concerned, the stuff was gold; it was worth a lot of money. I remember some of the young men joining training programs where they suffered radon gas exposure and cleaned up toxic hotspots without any protection from masks or even shower facilities. We did not know about the ore being health hazardous until 1945 when the government finally warned us about health and people started becoming sick.

Q: However, from what I understand, not only workers were affected by the effects. How did the radioactive ore spread through the community?

A: Like I said, we knew nothing about the dangers of the ore mined from Port Radium; before the mine, there was no industrial presence in our area. The men carried around sacks of the ore and tailings so it got into their clothes, into their skin. At one point we sewed some of the sacks to make tents and we also filled sandboxes from the fine sand-like tailings. Radioactivity went into the animals, our food source, our lake, and drinking water. The substance surrounded us and became a part of our lives, so unfortunately really everyone was affected.

Q: The toxic substance must have a huge impact on the environment and land as well; how much of it is in your land and how has it affected your people?

A: Waste landfills and lake dumps are everywhere. The tailings were dumped around the site and over 1.7 million tons of uranium waste was dumped north of Great Bear Lake. Our land, animals, and people have now been living with radioactivity for over 70 years. The first death of a radium mine happened in 1953, and an ore transporter in 1960. Since then there has been many deaths from poisoning, cancer, and other sicknesses. There are many single mothers now in Deline, and the generation of young men in this village is the first to grow up without knowledge passed on from their grandfathers, fathers, and uncles.

Q: In addition to hiding the health dangers of the ore, is it true that the government did not tell you what the uranium was to be used for?

A: Yes, we had no idea that the uranium we were mining and transporting was to be used in the Manhattan Project to create the atomic bomb. When we realized our work was used for objects of mass murder, we were horrified. Hearing about the absolute destruction dropped onto Hiroshima and Nagasaki made us want to take back all our work and despise our sacrifices even more. Had we known that the ore was making bombs, we would have never worked produced it. Until this day, we feel regret for contributing to that disaster.

Q: You must have felt outraged that the government neglected your health and denied you the information that would’ve saved many lives. The Dene people were unjustly used for labour; what actions were taken after your meeting with Parliament in Ottawa in 1999?

A: Well let me just say that white miners were as uninformed and abused as we were. We realized that the government did not care for any of us, so we went to Ottawa to ask for major cleanup of our community and an apology for the cultural, economic, spiritual, and emotional damage that they have caused us. It was a small victory for us to even get a formal meeting with the leaders of our country. They didn’t grant us our wish at the time, but we raised significant awareness and were closer to getting the improvements we wanted.

Q: I know that your tribe visited Japan and attended the memorial of August 6, 1945 as a way to pay respect and restore inner peace with the Japanese people. Why did you feel the need to go and what was it like to visit Japan?

A: We felt it was our duty to offer them our condolence, and it was necessary for our inner peace to apologize and make amends with the people whom we hurt. It was a very emotional trip; we cried when we saw footage of the explosions and the suffering that we caused. We lit lanterns and talked to many people; by the end we knew we made the right decision to come – it was a releasing and gratifying experience.

Q: What accomplishments have taken place at Deline now, and what are the Sahtu Dene’s visions for the future?

A: In 2007 we succeeded in negotiating with the government and earned a contract of 6.8 million dollars to help clean up the wastes. There is still a lot to be done to get rid of the radioactivity in Deline, and we will continue to fight for our rights as people. We are still trying to understand how something so bad could come from our Mother Nature; we celebrate the world we live in and pray for a better future.

Q: Thank you so much for your time; this has been such an eye-opening conversation. We wish you all the best!

Republished from 2010 Geography class. It is a hypothetical interview inspired by viewing 1999 documentary Village of Widows by Peter Blow.

Thanks for reading,
thebookybunhead

4 Comments

Filed under Academia, Words of No Wisdom